Fourth Person Singular

Nuar Alsadir

Liverpool University Press ($19.95)

 

“Every group has its emperor.”  Yes, we here in the U.S. know this all too well.  But thanks.

 

*

 

American Poets in the 21st Century: Poetics of Social Engagement

Ed. Michael Dowdy and Claudia Rankine

Wesleyan ($29.95)

 

What Lindsey Graham reads at night to cure his downright frightful insomnia.

 

*

 

The Cloud of Knowable Things

Elaine Equi

Coffee House Press ($15.00)

 

“O there is always a fly / in the petitfours,” just as there’s always a maggot in every living breathing poem.

 

*

 

The Ghosts of Monticello: A Recitatif

Carmen Gillespie

Stillhouse Press ($17.00)

 

The perfect gift for all your white nationalist friends.

 

*

 

Desert

David Hinton

Shambhala (16.95)

 

Plot summary: In the desert David Hinton reads a deserted book by David Hinton called Desert in which deserted David Hinton reads a desert book by desert-written David Hinton.

 

*

 

The Night’s Magician: Poems About the Moon

Ed. Philip C. Kolin and Sue Brannan Walker

Negative Capability Press ($25.95)

 

As Frank Sinatra once sang, “O moony moo moo moon.”

 

*

 

Kindest Regards: New and Selected

Ted Kooser

Copper Canyon ($30.00)

 

“Corn-fed poems,” said a Kooser critic of his poetry.  That’s so unfair.  They were also tenderly fed soybeans, wheat, barley, oats, and even sorghum.

 

*

 

Dreaming America: Voices of Undocumented Youth in Maximum-Security Detention

Ed. Seth Michelson

Settlement House ($16.00)

 

Further evidence to confirm your suspicions—America is a penal colony guarded by androids.

 

*

 

The Collected Poems of Alden Nowlan

Alden Nowlan, ed. Brian Bartlett

Icehouse Poetry ($55.00)

 

682 pages!  Really?   The Canadians are obviously out to embarrass us with every poem this better-than-your-average-American-poet has ever written.  Build the northern wall!

 

*

 

Falling Awake

Alice Oswald

W.W.Norton ($15.95)

 

Side effects of falling awake include sudden vision loss in one or both eyes, a desire to write microreviews, and the unshakable feeling that the title of this book comes from a song by Jethro Tull.

 

*

 

Architecture of Dispersed Life: Selected Poetry

Pablo de Rokha

Tr. Urayoán Noel

Shearsman Books ($23.00)

 

The gun that de Rokha used, in 1968, to take his own life, a Smith & Wesson .44 revolver, was a gift from the Mexican muralist David Alfaro Siqueiros.  Some say that gun was given to Siqueiros by Pablo Neruda, de Rokha’s eternal enemy.

 

*

 

America, We Call Your Name: Poems of Resistance & Resilience

Ed. Silverstein, Fleming, Knight, Miller, Wager, and Wickes

Sixteen Rivers Press ($20.00)

 

We now have enough Resistance poems to fill every room in the Trump Tower.

 

*

 

Octagon Commonweal

Michael Sweeney

Spuyten Duyvil ($15.00)

 

If Sweeney wishes Americans to read this book, or any poetry for that matter, he will have to climb into the Poetry Octagon with Jorie Graham and ejaculate a line from his book after each of her kicks or blows.

 

*

 

Monuments: Poems New and Selected

Natasha Trethewey

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt ($26.00)

 

Mississippi the only monument deserving of Mississippi.

 

 

Noontimes Won

Tristan Tzara, tr. Heather Green

Octopus Books ($14.95)

 

But is the title “Noontimes Won”?  Or “Meridian Spread”?  Or “Lunchtime Earned”?  Or “To Grow Midday”?  Or “Gaining on Your Lower Regions”?  Or “O Moony Moo Moo Moon.”

 

*

 

Taking the Arrow Out of the Heart

Alice Walker

Atria ($25.00)

 

Walker is a recent winner (along with Linh Dinh) of the David Duke Award for Nationalist Poetical Arts.

 

 

*

 

The Collected Stories of Diane Williams

Diane Williams

Soho ($28.00)

 

Not quite stories.  Not quite poetry.  But who will tell the author?  Who will climb in the Indeterminant Poetry Octagon and face Diane “Bonecrusher” Williams?